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#IWD2018 - Erin Fazackerley

08 March 2018

Today, Thursday 8 March 2018, is International Women's Day as set by the United Nations and is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women.

Cricket Tasmania firmly believes and promotes the equal footing between our men's and women's players, administrators, staff, coaches, supporters and volunteers - from the grassroots right up to the Tasmanian Tigers and Tasmanian Roar plus our BBL and WBBL Hobart Hurricanes.

The 2017-18 summer has been a breakout period for emerging Tasmanian cricketer Erin Fazackerley, with the talented all-rounder making her WNCL, WBBL and Governor-General XI debuts in a short space of time.

Fazackerley is a prime example of the exciting future that awaits Tasmanian and Australian cricket with the talented 19-year-old possessing a skillset that makes her the ideal cricketer.

With the ability to bowl at good pace in tidy areas, impressive efforts in the field and the ability to wield the willow, Fazackerley has immediately become a key figure within the Tasmanian Roar and Hobart Hurricanes set-ups.

WATCH: Fazackerley adds vital late runs

   

Fazackerley concedes it has been a summer of firsts, with her 2-13 bowling performance for the Governor-General’s XI against England putting her name up in lights on the national stage.

“Playing the Governor-General’s XI game was a real highlight for me. I have been working and training hard down here in Tassie and to have that recognition on a national level was really exciting and not something I thought would come this year,” she said.

This match came just a month after her WNCL debut for the Roar and nearly a month before she made her WBBL debut for the Hurricanes against the star-studded Sydney Sixers.

“As I got older I started to look up to Ellyse Perry. Her game is something like what I try to play – she tries to bowl fast and doesn’t shy away from batting, she is now one of the best batters in the world.

“My first WBBL game was against the Sixers. I was thinking to myself ‘oh my god, there is Ellyse Perry, there is Alyse Healy’.

“I had to tell myself to focus and not fan girl out,” she said.

Fazackerley started playing cricket when she was around 10 years of age, playing cricket with the boys at the Lindisfarne Cricket Club before going on to play for Clarence in the Women’s competition at just 12 years of age.

Fazackerley, whose aunty Kim was the first Tasmanian female to play cricket for Australia, has gained plenty of insight from Kim over the years but first became hooked on the game thanks to her older brother, Blair.

“We played a lot of sports in the backyard and I watched him play cricket a lot and decided that I wanted to have a crack myself.

“When I was younger I played every sport and would bring a flyer home to mum all the time saying ‘I want to play this, I want to play that.

“I was a sports nut-  lot of tennis, soccer and netball. Tennis was probably my main sport for a long time but eventually I got better opportunities in Tassie with cricket and made the decision for it to be my main sport,” she said.

WATCH: Fazackerley strikes in Perth

 

Fazackerley is eager to see where women’s cricket is going, citing the rapid growth of recent years as only a snippet of what’s to come.

“You can see across the last 5-7 years that there is a clear growth. When my friend and I started playing as 12-year-old girls we played with the women because it was the only comp available to us. Now girls gave the under-14 and under-17 competitions to develop with other girls their own age.

Although her rise has been rapid, Fazackerley appreciates the opportunity cricket provides for her to be a role model for emerging cricketers and fans.

“It’s really exciting and nice to have that opportunity to have an influence and to be a positive influence,” she said.

Fazackerley was proud to represent her city and state for the first time this summer and has been given the opportunity to thrive thanks to the supportive nature of the Hurricanes and Roar squads.

“The great thing about our teams is that everyone takes it upon themselves to help and show support around training.

“As a younger player everyone is willing to help you. Brooke Hepburn and Corinne Hall have been great and it is really important that they are happy to take on that role while in positions of captain and vice-captain,” she said.